Archive for the ‘Reinventing Your Career’ Category

  • Are You An Intrapreneur?

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    intrapreneurship

    For those of you 40+ who may be wavering between hanging on to a job that’s a bore but you cannot afford to leave it or girding your loins and striking out on your own to start a small business, take heart – there is a third option: Intrapreneurship!

    Intrapreneurship is the art of applying all your creative genes to the job at hand so you reignite your passion for it and simultaneously fuel your organization’s success. No matter if you work within a corporation, government, educational institution, microenterprise, association or a nonprofit, all – including you – are able to benefit from your intrapreneurship.

    David Armano wrote a great Forbes magazine article, Move Over Entrepreneurs, Here Come The Intrapreneurs, where he defines an intrapreneur as, “someone who has an entrepreneurial streak in his or her DNA, but chooses to align his or her talents with a large organization in place of creating his or her own.”

    Armano concludes, “So here’s to intrapreneurs everywhere: The corporate world needs us now more than ever, and you might just be one without knowing it.”

    And that “without knowing it” is the hitch: if you’ve never defined yourself as such, how are you supposed to know if you are an intrapreneur or even more, if you want to be one, how can you make it happen?

    The good news is that eProvStudio’s unique and extremely pro-active workshops, specifically designed for 40+ year olds, use the art of improvisation to decode and catalyze your entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial thinking skills. They unleash your potential to ignite and build ideas into opportunities – in life, work or a new business startup – to add new meaning and purpose to your life.

    Isn’t it time for you to fall in love again???

    Courtesy, Hugh MacLeod

    Courtesy, Hugh MacLeod

     

  • When It’s Okay to Let Your Brand Go to The Dogs!

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    It’s very okay when you’re a dog walker!

    When I read  Corey Kilgannon’s  article, “Dressed to Lead the Pack,” in the New York Times this week, I recognized a hugely successful branding story.

    It’s Precious Costello Caldwell’s story, a dog walker who sets a unique sartorial tone for himself, his employees and even his dogs. Mr. Caldwell was 67 years old and contemplating a career change when he got the inspiration for his new business. Sitting on a park bench in New York City, he noticed the dog walkers looked rather shabby compared to the well-groomed pets in their care.

    He realized that the same owners, who valued the image of their pampered pets, would also value a unique image for their dog walkers and he set about creating a professional brand dog owners could trust.

    “Mr. Caldwell,” says Kilgannon, “is always impeccably turned out in an outfit that seems to borrow equally from Ralph Lauren, Indiana Jones and the Marlboro Man: boots, rugged canvas pants, an olive green sweater and a matching vest bearing a self-drawn logo for his dog-walking company, Royal Wolves.  He provides the same outfit to his staff of other dog walkers. The pups themselves he accessorizes with real leather leashes and a yellow neckerchief, custom printed with the dog’s name.”

    Caldwell says, “We are such eye catchers, everyone asks us for a business card.”

    Caldwell exemplified these 3 classic branding techniques as he took his brand to the dogs – and success:

    1. Establishing His Character, Originality and Authenticity.  Too many brands are packaged, programmed, and plastic. You won’t get very far if you try to be something you’re not. Rather, your personal brand is about figuring out who you really are and what you do best, and then living that brand out. It’s the essence of authenticity.

    2. Identifying and Showcasing His Skills and Talents.   Caldwell had grown up living next door to a kennel where he helped walk the dogs, and years later the skills and his affection for dogs still came naturally to him.

    3. Letting His Voice Be Heard and Seen. In this multimedia world you need to create a spoken, written, and visual message, which is relevant and consistent. Caldwell says, “I stand out. I’m a walking advertisement. People see me and they tell their friends.”

    As we said in an earlier blog post, you have the power to Be Like Matisse and Reinvent Your Life as a Work of Art, or, as in Precious Caldwell’s case,  as the leader of a pack – of dogs of course!

  • Six Reasons Why It’s Time for You To Write a Book!

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    You’ve done all the right things to try and secure a job. You’ve honed your experience and qualifications to create a brand for yourself and retooled your old resumé into a pro-active working proposal. More, you’ve networked your socks off and beefed up your interviewing skills.  Yet – and yet, and yet you’re still unemployed. You may feel you have every right to be blue, but why waste the time?  As Confucious said, “To be wronged is nothing, unless you continue to remember it.”

    Why not take advantage of this hiatus and write about all those “right” things you’ve accomplished in your job search.  Writing a book can be a terrific new self-marketing tool.

    Here are six great reasons for you to hit the keyboard, start typing, or even take pen in hand:

    1. Share your expertise – Expand the experience that you’ve bulleted in your resumé. In a book you can include a story or two to bring that expertise to life and help others.

    2. Build Your Authority – Nothing beats authority like having a published book. You can become the go-to resource in your area of expertise.

    3. Separate yourself from the competition – Writing a book provides an opportunity for people to hear your thoughts and insights. Don’t be afraid to say what you really think. Be authentic and your voice will stand out.

    4. Expand your network – Too often we limit ourselves to who and what we know. Your book can introduce you to individuals who you never thought would be interested in your passions.

    5. Break down your protective/self-limiting walls – If you’ve never written a book before you, the experience will jolt you out of your comfort zone. Acting outside the box you’ve created for yourself is a great experience. As we’ve said before, “You have to step outside the batting cage to hit a home run.”

    6. Change your life – Even though you began with the idea of sharing your expertise with the world, the very act of writing is introspective. As you review what you’ve done and strategies you’ve designed, you may come up with a brand new idea of what you’d like to do next!

    And the best part about writing a book is that you don’t need to wait for someone to read your resumé, to invite you to an interview, or for that next networking event. You can “Just Start!”

    Happy Thanksgiving, and we look forward to seeing your name in print.

  • The Open 24-Hours Diner, the Open Talent Economy, and a Gent Named “Sawbones”

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    Diner

    I love diners – always have. You can eat whatever you want whenever you want. There’s no, “we stop serving breakfast at ten.” I can pop in for eggs over easy and bacon charred to a crisp (the way I like it) at 3pm or 3am.

    Who knew that these culinary establishments would be trendsetters? I read about today’s “Open Talent Economy,” and think that economy du jour is perfect for those of us aged 50+ who wish to work at what we want when we want.

    Deloitte has a nifty report, explaining the nuts and bolts of an “Open Talent Economy,” and Elaine Pofeldt writes in Forbes, Traditional Jobs Keep Fading, and It’s Time to Adapt.

    This is good news for the legions of 50+ year olds who are out of work, many of whom statistics demonstrate can basically forget about getting hired for a full-time job.

    But the remarkable, true story, “On the Contrary: Taking a Tip From Sawbones’s Career,” shared by Susan Jepson, Director of the National Senior Network, SCSEP, in Lowell, Massachusetts, brings to life just what it means to be multi-talented in today’s economy.

    Susan writes:

    I was rushing through the white-tented terminal at Denver International Airport when my attention was diverted by a storefront massage business.  Checking my wristwatch, I calculated that I had just enough time for a 20-minute massage.

    I settled onto the light gray vinyl chair and placed my face inside the cushioned headrest.  The massage therapist introduced himself.  “I’m Lee,” he said.  “But friends call me Sawbones.”

    He must have seen the cartoon question mark floating above my head in an imaginary white bubble — Sawbones? — for he went on to tell me about himself.

    Digging his thumbs into the back of my neck, Sawbones explained that massage was a new line of work for him.

    “Do you like it?” I asked.

    “Yes ma’am,” he said, revealing a slight rancher’s drawl.  “I get to meet interesting people, especially here at the airport.  A few weeks ago, I massaged Timothy McVeigh’s lawyer, who was on his way to the execution…He was a little tense.”

    Although that demanded a smart-alecky response, I could not think of one fast enough.  Instead. I asked Sawbones if he worked only at the airport.

    “No ma’am,” he said, I also have an office by the Stock Show Complex.  I have another business. “Custom cowboy hats.”

    “ The cartoon question mark made another appearance.” Cowboy hats?”

    “Yes ma’am. I sell them at the Grizzly Rose, the country-western bar on I-25.”

    I inhaled the rosemary scent of the massage oil and debated whether to prod Sawbones for more information.  Since I was unlikely to meet another cowboy-hat-maker masseur in the near future, I asked him if his massage business was growing.

    “Yes ma’am. See, I massage horses, too.”

    “Horses?” I asked, feeling like I was being sucked down a conversational rabbit hole.

    “Yes ma’am. Horses like massage.  They can get testy though.”

    “I’ll bet,” I said, picturing a blond Palomino lying hooves up on a massage table.

    As Sawbones kneaded my upper arms, he asked what I did for a living.

    “I’m a writer,” I said. Actually, I didn’t say that because just then, his fingers pushed my head into the headrest, making my answer sound more like “Imamiffer.”

    Sawbones was unfazed.  “Really?! I’m a writer, too!” he exclaimed, as if we were distant cousins meeting at a genealogy conference. I write scripts!”

    “Scripts?”

    “Yes ma’am. See I also perform in Wild West shows.”

    The rabbit hole was getting deeper by the second. “What kinds of things are in your shows?”

    “Shoot-outs.  Stuff like that. I have a friend who looks like Abraham Lincoln.  He’s gonna be in our show tomorrow night.”

    Now, I’ve never been that great at history, but it seems to me the Lincoln didn’t have that much to do with the Wild West. I was about to ask Sawbones how Abe figured into his act when he pulled my arms behind my back and away from my body like he was dressing a chicken.

    Soon, our 20 minutes was up, and Sawbones handed me his business card: ”Massage,” it read.  “For Horses and Humans.”

    “Just for future reference,” he added, “I also do home massage. It’s only 50 bucks, and I bring my own table, oil, and CD’s.” I accept the card graciously, even though I was fairly certain I’d never pay a man named Sawbones to tote oil and soft music into my house.

    It’s been a week since my encounter with the custom-cowboy-hat-making, Wild West show performing, horse- and – human massage therapist, and I can’t get him out of my mind.;  The more I think about Sawbones, the more I think he is ideally suited to today’s work world.  He’s adaptable, multi-talented, enthusiastic, and independent.  Think about it. They say people in their twenties today can expect to have seven different careers.  Sawbones has all seven at once.

    Now, I know there are people who might find Sawbones a little lowbrow and unfocused.  But to me, Sawbones is wise. He can work indoors or out.  He has built-in job security.  The bottom could fall out of the cowboy-hat market and Sawbones would still make it in the world.

    To check my impressions of him as a poster child for the new economy, I referred to Career Intelligence: The 12 New Rules for Work and Life Success, by Barbara Moses, Ph.D.  Here are a few of them:

    1. Ensure marketability: Sawbones has not one but seven fallback positions.  He has a broad network of contacts.  And, with a slogan that reads “Healing the West one massage at a time,” Sawbones clearly knows what creative marketing is all about.

    2. Be able to communicate:  In the space of 20 minutes, Sawbones managed to sell me on his talent, enthusiasm, business, savvy, and manners.  I haven’t been called ma’am so much since I invited a vacuum cleaner salesman into my house—something you should never do under any circumstances.

    3. Think income streams, not salary:  By calculations, Sawbones has at least six income sources, all in which include the potential for tips.

    In fact, Sawbones has already figured out what many of us spend our entire careers learning: how important it is to always try new things.  “Ma’am,” he said, “I do all these things because I promised myself I would never do the same boring thing all day long.”

    Now, most people I know have said this same thing to themselves at one time or another.  But the difference between Sawbones and most people is that he is not afraid to tackle new challenges.  Think about him the next time you’re confronted with a new opportunity.

     

  • 5 Strategies to Beat those Extended Unemployment Blues and Re-boot Your Career – Indeed Your Life!

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    These strategic steps are designed to help you to use this downtime to invest in yourself. These are not soothing tips to help distract you from your feelings of anxiety. If you’re out of work and don’t want to be, the loss of identity can be overwhelming, but, as the late, John Gardner said, “you have more power in you than you know, so pull up your socks and get on with it.”

    In this case “pulling up your socks” requires more than pluck and optimism. To proactively and purposefully re-boot your career, you need to begin with some hard-core introspection. You need to assess the depth of your experience, to understand how your skill sets relate to and can be applied to what you’d like to do next, to identify what you don’t know that you need to learn, and to have the courage to move forward.

    1. Accept the reality. We’ve all read the stats that, if you’re over 40, it could take a year or more to find new work.

    2. Explore what makes you tick. Do a formal assessment such as: Myers Briggs, The Birkman Method or Clifton Strengths Finder to determine your strengths, values, priorities, motivators and align your goals.

    3. Mine your hidden talents. Someone once said, “The greatest wastes are unused talents and untried ideas.” What ideas do you have quietly percolating on a back burner?  Do you have a hobby that could be a good business venture? Here are 3 ideas to get you started:

    1) Rebuilding the world one toothpick at a time. Stan Munro was out of work, when he began building things with toothpicks. He started with small churches, progressed to cathedrals, and then whole cities made entirely of thousands of toothpicks. He was invited to display his artwork at a museum in Spain and is now exhibiting his toothpick masterpieces in museums all over the world.

    2) Decluttering your speciality? As you clear out stuff, think about selling those treasures on sites like eBay, Craig’s List, Tradesy.com, and Etsy, at yard sales or give away what you don’t need. Perhaps you have a real knack for it and can help others set up systems to declutter their lives. Then, too, you could set up a shop and sell their things online for a commission, if they’d prefer not to get into the online marketplace.

    3) Create a blog. Not only will it sharpen your social media skills, it could turn into other writing assignments, a book or maybe even a movie. The Meryl Streep movie, “Julie and Julia,” began as a blog about a disgruntled office worker blogging about trying every recipe in Julia Childs’ The Art of French Cooking.

    4. Become a Skills’ Learning Magnet.  Do not rest on your laurels. Yes, 25 years of solid accomplishments add gravitas to your resumé, but you could also sink like a stone under the weight of that gravitas if you do not convert past kudos into present-day assets. “Real knowledge,” Confucius said, “is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.”

    First, determine what skills you need or need to re-tune. This might seem a daunting task, but good help is available at the O*Net Resource Center. The Occupational Information Network (O*NET) is a free online tool developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA) through a grant to the North Carolina Employment Security Commission. The O*NET program is the nation’s primary source of occupational information. Central to the project is the O*NET database, containing information on hundreds of standardized and occupation-specific descriptors. The database, which is available to the public at no cost, is continually updated by surveying a broad range of workers from each occupation. The database also provides the basis for their Career Exploration Tools, a set of valuable assessment instruments for workers looking to find or change careers.

    5. Put a lid on your shy genes.  As we mentioned in an earlier post, “You have to step out of the batting cage to hit a home run!” Volunteer, but don’t just volunteer to stamp envelopes. Join a committee at your neighborhood school, church or business club. Get involved to connect, learn and use this opportunity to test market your idea or product. For example, if cupcakes or natural snacks are your passion, offer to provide refreshments and listen to your customers’ “feedback.”

    Don’t let your fear of being wrong paralyze you. Thomas Alva Edison did not think of his experiments in terms of success or failure, but rather as learning. In his efforts to create the first storage battery, he conducted 10,000 experiments!

    It takes courage to believe in your self, to start something new. Thinking of “The Wizard of Oz” celebrating its 75th birthday and record of the most watched movie of all time, I remember this quote about the cowardly lion from Mary Anne Radmacher, “Courage does not always roar. Sometimes it is a quiet voice at the end of the day, saying…’I will try again tomorrow.”

  • Buzzed Bees, Boomerangs, and Provocateurs = Indefatigable Boomers

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    Last week, over lunch with a colleague, I heard about a school science project where an enterprising student (her son) sprinkled drops of dark roast coffee over some luxurious blossoms to asses the affect on the normally no slacker worker bees hovering over the garden. Result = ravenous worker bees become super buzzed.

    Later that afternoon, I read these remarkable Stories of Baby Boomerangs in the San Francisco Chronicle. Baby Boomerangs is the handle, authors Sam Whiting, Meredith May, and Bek Phillips, give to “people in their 50s and 60s who walk out the door of one career in order to walk in the door of another.”

    Their “Boomerangs” include a career attorney, who launches a doggie day care business; a US Air Force E-7 master sergeant, who retires his wings and takes to his feet to deliver mail; and a 60-year-old woman with a successful engineering career, who “was on the back of a BMW motorcycle in La Paz, Baja, when her second career idea hit her. She rode directly to the airport and caught a plane to get her to San Francisco in time to grab the last spot in a yearlong certificate program to become a life coach.”

    Then to cap off the week, I read Over 50 and Under No Illusions by Caitlin Kelly in the New York Times. Kelly says, “It’s a baby boomer’s nightmare. One moment you’re 40-ish and moving up, the next you’re 50-plus and suddenly, shockingly, moving out — jobless in a tough economy.”

    Kelly describes five Boomers who have gone through the emotional and financial strains of late-career unemployment and have successfully come out the other end of that dismal tunnel by tuning up their skills, plucking up their determination, and catching a bit of luck.  “Changing jobs or careers turned out to be a good thing,” she says, “despite the many risks involved” for this indefatigable five.

    These Boomerangs – with their extra Buzz and a good dose of their inner provocateur asking what’s next – can inspire us all to embrace the new year as an opportunity for change and reinvention.

     

     

  • Be Like Matisse and Reinvent Your Life as a Work of Art!

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    Throughout his long and productive 84-year career, world-renown French artist, Henri Matisse (1869-1953), continually redirected his creative energies by tackling at least six different styles of painting, sculpture, paper cut-outs, illustrated books, architectural design and stained-glass windows.

    And, all of this happened after Matisse had launched his first career as a lawyer! Yes, a lawyer. When he was eighteen, Matisse’s father encouraged him to study law in Paris. For two years, Matisse did brilliantly even though he found law boring and totally uninspiring, and then he was struck down with appendicitis. To ease his convalescence, his mother brought him a box of art supplies. Matisse said, “From the moment I held the box of colors in my hands, I knew this was my life.” His father was deeply disappointed, but his mother, whose art had been limited to painting designs on porcelain, advised her son not to adhere to the “rules” of art, but rather listen to his own emotions. And that is what Matisse did – over and over again – as he was living his art.

    He began painting still-lives and landscapes in the traditional Flemish style, but quickly transitioned to Impressionism, painting his first masterpiece The Dinner Table in 1897. The French traditionalists denounced it and, discouraged by their response, Matisse briefly turned to sculpture. Though he did not pursue this for long, it continued to influence form in his painting for the rest of his life.

    His next style, Modernism, was influenced by such post-Impressionists as Paul Cézanne and Gauguin. From there, he dabbled in Pointillism and Naturalism. That’s five stylistic reinventions so far in this his second career. His sixth came in 1905, when he was considered the leader of the Fauve painting movement.

    Over the next 36 years, he created hundreds of masterpieces until he was diagnosed with cancer in 1941 and the surgery necessitated he use a wheelchair. Physically diminished, his creativity soared to new heights. He called what was to be his last 14 years, “Une seconde vie,” a second life. He created his vibrant cut paper collages, and described the process as “painting with scissors.” His assistants helped him mount the cut-outs on the walls of his room and he said, “You see, as I am obliged to remain often in bed because of the state of my health, I have made a little garden all around me where I can walk… There are leaves, fruits, a bird.” Then, in 1947 he published Jazz, a brilliant, limited-edition book containing prints of his colorful cut paper collages.

    Lastly, Matisse’s final reinvention was to design in 1951 the interior and the stained-glass windows for the Chapelle du Rosaire in Vence.

    Matisse was a genius at reinvention – an inspiration to all of us to try it at least once. The good news is that there’s lots of help out there. Here are four great places to start:

    Seth Godin, marketing guru, entrepreneur, and best-selling author of fourteen books that have been translated into more than thirty languages, has written, Why We Are All Artists. In his online conversation he describes how we are all “capable of making a difference, of being bold, and of changing more than we are willing to admit. We are capable of making art.”

    The Idea Champions share 50 Ways to Foster Innovation. This blog post is about developing a culture of sustainable innovation in organizations, but the same principles apply to individual lives, as well.

    From the Harvard Business Review Blog, check out,  How to Master a New Skill.

    And don’t miss Kerry Hannon’s terrific new book, Great Jobs for Everyone 50+: Finding Work that Keeps You Healthy and Happy, and Pays the Bills, which was named book-of-the-month in the Washington Post’sColor of Money Book Club“.

    Happy New Year and Happy New You!

     

  • Just Start!

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    Courtesy, TwistedPoly.com

     

    One book and two blog posts I read this week – and another classic tome – hold our entrepreneurial, career shifting toes to the fire – as in stop over assessing, evaluating and planning and Just Start!

    The book, Just Start: Take Action, Embrace Uncertainty, Create the Future, by Len Schlesinger, President, Babson College; organizational learning expert Charles Kiefer; and veteran journalist Paul B. Brown is a stirring, practical pronunciamento. Each author shares his own deep and varied experiences and draws from a source where striving amid constant uncertainty actually works: the world of serial entrepreneurship. In this world, people don’t just think differently—they act differently, as well.

    Their dynamic manifesto begins in the epigraph where they invoke Lao-tzu, the Chinese philsopher’s, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” It ends (but is it really an ending if you follow their practicum?) as they capture the essence of the book in 78 pro-active words in the epilogue:

    1. Know what you want.

    2. Take a smart step toward that desire as quickly as you can, that is, act with the means at hand; stay within your acceptable loss and bring others along with you if it makes sense.

    3. Make reality your friend. Accept what is and build off what you find.

    4. Repeat steps two and three until you accomplish your goal or until you decide it is not possible, or you decide you’d rather do something else.

    One of the blog posts I mentioned earlier is The Habit of Starting written by Leo Babauta on his Zen Habits blog. Babauta says, “The biggest reason people fail at creating and sticking to new habits is that they don’t keep doing it. That seems obvious: if you don’t keep doing a habit, it won’t really become a habit. So what’s the solution to this obvious problem? Find a way to keep doing it.

    When you look at it this way, the key to forming a habit is not how much you do of the habit each day (exercise for 30 minutes, write 1,000 words, etc.), but whether you do it at all. So the key is just getting started.”

    The second great blog post is Tim Berry’s What Business to Start? Look in the Mirror.  Berry writes, “So you want to start a business, but don’t know what kind? Sure, you can get a list of franchises or ask the experts what are good businesses to start. That works for some people. Lists of businesses to start are easy to find. My advice, however, is don’t look for a list of good businesses. Don’t ask what the big opportunities are. Get a clue. Go look in the mirror.”

    Last but not least, the “classic tome” is  The Art of the Start: The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything by Guy Kawasaki. Aimed at entrepreneurs of any age, it is one of the most enlightening and inspiring books I have read on this subject.

  • How to Avoid the “Over-Qualified” Rejection Blues!

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    Courtesy, Artfulrabbit.com

    You spend your life trying to get experience – then suddenly have too much!

    Employers don’t care about past experience. CEOs care about business outcomes and profitability; they want to know what you can do for them now.

    You need to translate or reframe your experience to demonstrate how you can solve today’s business problems. And be passionate – it is key to your being hired over someone who has the skills or experience but could not care less.

    These are just a few of the points David DeLong discusses in this outstanding video produced by an equally outstanding project called Over50AndOutofWork. David DeLong is a research fellow at the MIT AgeLab, founder of David DeLong & Associates, author of Lost Knowledge:  Confronting the Threat of an Aging Workforce and co-author of the study Buddy, Can You Spare a Job?. DeLong provides very specific recommendations and strategies for older jobseekers to maximize the success of their job search – and the good news is that he is optimistic about the future for older workers.

    This is a 30-minute video – don’t miss a minute of DeLong’s valuable tips!

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  • Buttermilk Biscuits and Super Start-Ups – A Delight to the Cents and Senses!

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    Courtesy, Gourmet Live

    The latest issue of Gourmet Live magazine celebrates America’s top food entrepreneurs – and what a feast it is.

    Gourmet writes, “There’s no question that the food and beverage industry is tough. Profit margins are small and failure rates are high—roughly 80 percent of restaurants, for example, don’t make it to their second birthday. But it can also be an incredibly rewarding business for those plucky and lucky enough to find success—the Entrepreneurs issue of Gourmet Live salutes those who have already made it and those on their way.”

    They begin their tour of “the upstarts and start-ups driving change in the culinary world” top 25 American food entrepreneurs of the past 25 years. Kate Sekules pays tribute to major players such as Mario Batali, Annie Chun, and Starbucks’ Howard Schultz, who have not only made their fortunes but also “shifted the axis of American taste.”

    “If you have a quit-your-day-job dream simmering, you’ll be inspired by three more tales of passion and perseverance in this issue: St. John Frizell’s firsthand account of launching his Brooklyn bar/café, Fort Defiance; a visit by Jean Anderson to Saxapahaw General Store, the North Carolina haute eatery that gives the term filling station a whole new meaning; and an ode to the makers of Kate’s Real Buttermilk, who turned a butter by-product into liquid gold, penned by Gourmet Live’s Kemp Minifie.”

    Edible entrepreneurship indeed!!

     

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