Posts Tagged ‘Leonardo Da Vinci’

  • Two Best Resumés Ever and Mr. Magoo

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    Stop Trying to Age-proof Your Resume!  Focus on what you can do and be assertive. Don’t hold back – it pays to be assertive no matter what your circumstances.

    Look at the recent revival of one of the most cantankerous “old” men of all time, as noted by NY Times reviewer, J. Hoberman, in Oh, Magoo, You’ve Done It Again.

    The diminutive, permanently squinting codger made his debut in 1949. The cartoon’s humor is predicated almost entirely on his stubborn refusal to recognize his myopic mistakes. Who can forget Magoo’s knack for addressing his reflection in a storefront window or lecturing a fireplug.

    At the opposite end of the age curve in resumés, check out this phenemonal job application Eudora Welty sent to The New Yorker in March of 1933. Shane Parrish in the Farnam Street Blog tells us how Eudora Welty, at age 23 and looking for writing work, sent this beautiful letter to the offices of The New Yorker. “It’s difficult,” writes Shaun Usher in his introduction to the letter in Letters of Note, “to imagine a more endearingly written introduction to one’s talents.”

    The New Yorker, missing Welty’s obvious talent, ignored her plea, but the indomitable writer was not dissuaded. She went on to win multiple awards including the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1973 for her novel The Optimist’s Daughter.

    If you don’t find that enough assertion, take a peek at Leonardo DaVinci’s letter to Ludovico Sforza, the Duke of Milan, applying for a job in 1481:

    “Having, most illustrious lord, seen and considered the experiments of all those who pose as masters in the art of inventing instruments of war, and finding that their inventions differ in no way from those in common use, I am emboldened, without prejudice to anyone, to solicit an appointment of acquainting your Excellency with certain of my secrets.

    1. I can construct bridges which are very light and strong and very portable, with which to pursue and defeat the enemy; and others more solid, which resist fire or assault, yet are easily removed and placed in position; and I can also burn and destroy those of the enemy.

    2. In case of a siege I can cut off water from the trenches and make pontoons and scaling ladders and other similar contrivances.

    3. If by reason of the elevation or the strength of its position a place cannot be bombarded, I can demolish every fortress if its foundations have not been set on stone.

    4. I can also make a kind of cannon which is light and easy of transport, with which to hurl small stones like hail, and of which the smoke causes great terror to the enemy, so that they suffer heavy loss and confusion.

    5. I can noiselessly construct to any prescribed point subterranean passages either straight or winding, passing if necessary underneath trenches or a river.

    6. I can make armoured wagons carrying artillery, which shall break through the most serried ranks of the enemy, and so open a safe passage for his infantry.

    7. If occasion should arise, I can construct cannon and mortars and light ordnance in shape both ornamental and useful and different from those in common use.

    8. When it is impossible to use cannon I can supply in their stead catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other instruments of admirable efficiency not in general use — In short, as the occasion requires I can supply infinite means of attack and defense.

    9. And if the fight should take place upon the sea I can construct many engines most suitable either for attack or defense and ships which can resist the fire of the heaviest cannon, and powders or weapons.

    10. In time of peace, I believe that I can give you as complete satisfaction as anyone else in the construction of buildings both public and private, and in conducting water from one place to another.

    I can further execute sculpture in marble, bronze or clay, also in painting I can do as much as anyone else, whoever he may be.

    Moreover, I would undertake the commission of the bronze horse, which shall endue with immortal glory and eternal honour the auspicious memory of your father and of the illustrious house of Sforza.

    And if any of the aforesaid things should seem to anyone impossible or impracticable, I offer myself as ready to make trial of them in your park or in whatever place shall please your Excellency, to whom I commend myself with all possible humility.

    Leonardo Da Vinci”

    At last, we know the reason behind that enigmatic smile!

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  • Pitch – Is Yours Perfect or Are You Tone Deaf?

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    Pitch is both a verb and a noun.

    Verb:  One can pitch an idea, a story, a song, a ball – one’s self.

    Noun:  The pitch is an idea, story, song – your self.

    They are two distinct art forms. One can have perfect pitch, as in singing the true sound of any note in a piece of music, and still not understand the song.

    Others can have a profound connection with a song and miss the true notes. If you’ve watched “The Voice” more than once on TV, you’ll have heard the ultimate criticism, “Pitchy!”   When one of the judges declares a singer’s voice “pitchy” – not true, nor flat nor sharp but all over the place, it’s the kiss of death.

    Don’t be tone deaf. When pitching yourself for a job you need to nail both the notes and the story. You must focus on your content, delivery, and above all – your value. The perfect pitch is so much more than what you know; it has to be about what you can do with what you know for the organization where you’d like to work. (See our earlier post on Leonardo Da Vinci’s radical working resumé.)

    Three tips to get you off on the right note:

    1. Create a compelling story: Put your best foot forward. The competition is fierce and you need to be able to demonstrate you are the best of the best.  Focus on what you have to offer and why it will be of value – what’s in it for the organization. You know all about using active verbs but do not forget the blockbuster nouns – key words – that capture you, your strengths and your industry savvy.

    2. Do your research: Know what problems/challenges your company-to-be needs to address and position yourself as key to delivering a distinctive, pro-active, sustainable solution.

    3. Data: Don’t forget to include real evidence: metrics to quantify your successes and specific examples to qualify your accomplishments. You want to demonstrate the impact – outcomes and not just outputs – you can achieve to make a real difference.

    It’s time to reclaim the positive aspects of pitching. You’re not a used car salesman trying to off-load a wreck. Nor are you a fickle, pie-in-the-sky visionary. As Yann Martel’s character, Pi, says in his book, Life of Pi,

    and the spectacular new movie, “I had to stop hoping so much that a ship would rescue me. I should not count on outside help. Survival had to start with me. In my experience, a castaway’s worst mistake is to hope too much and do too little. Survival starts by paying attention to what is close at hand and immediate. To look out with idle hope is tantamount to dreaming one’s life away.”

    Ludwig van Beethoven said, “Music is the soil in which the spirit lives, thinks, and invents.”

    Soooo, warm up your vocal chords and pitch the music of your life and work!

     

  • Barbells and Brains

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    If, like Leonardo, you wish to develop a dazzling “working resumé” (see SSW’s 1/26/10 post) it behooves you to keep in top form – mentally and physically.

    This snippet, Exercise: In Women, Training for a Sharper Mind by Roni Caryn Rabin from the NY Times, heralds a new study from Canada which has demonstrated that “Older women who did an hour or two of strength [not just toning] training exercises each week had improved cognitive function a year later, scoring higher on tests of the brain processes responsible for planning and executing tasks.”

    Exciting news, but for those men and women not yet ready to heft the barbells, hope thrives in this fascinating and equally energizing article by Jane E. Brody, Healthy Aging, With Nary a Supplement.

    Brody notes, “The desire to achieve a healthy old age is laudable indeed, and will be even more so in the future. According to a projection of the century-long rise in life expectancy published in The Lancet in October, 2009, more than half the children born since 2000 in wealthy countries can expect to celebrate their 100th birthday. If so many of us are destined to become centenarians, it is all the more important to be able to enjoy those years unencumbered by chronic disease and disability. There is no virtue in simply living long; the goal should be to live long and well.”

    “Americans have yet to learn,” she continues, “what Hippocrates, the father of medicine, recognized in 400 B.C. ‘All parts of the body which have a function if used in moderation and exercised in labors in which each is accustomed, become thereby healthy, well developed and age more slowly; but if unused and left idle they become liable to disease, defective in growth and age quickly.’ ”

    She concludes, “It’s time to stop making excuses and make regular physical activity an integral part of your life, like eating, sleeping and brushing your teeth.”

    Soooo, put an extra dollop on your toothbrush, walk twice around your accustomed one-circle block, maybe begin to carry a baseball (Leonardo preferred a chisel) in each hand. Before you know it you, too, will be reaching for the barbells, nudging those neurons and enhancing your brain’s capacity.


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